May 14, 2019

Jordan Peterson is an intelligent human being.  Some might say intimidatingly so.  But intelligence is no doubt highly correlated with wealth and, in the case of Peterson, he uses his intelligence to twist and manipulate readers to sell an ideology that a segment of society has up until now been reluctant to voice.  Peterson’s article in the increasingly right wing National Post is a mouthful.  Resembling the highly unnecessary and obtuse vocabulary that, like his count...

September 1, 2018

Nike was a multinational corporation headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon[i].  Its growth since its founding in 1964 was remarkable, climbing to $49 million in 1982 from just $60,000 ten years earlier[ii] and then to $9 billion by the mid-1990s[iii].  By 1998, 40% of the athletic footwear market was controlled by Nike.  Nike reached $20 billion in revenue in 2011 and, as of 2017, had a market cap of $29.6 billion and holds the title for the world’s largest supplier of athletic shoes and...

April 1, 2018

With my grandmother passing recently, I've decided to repost a story I wrote about how important it is that her very sustainable approach to food must not die with her. 

Here is the post:

At seven years old I playfully follow my grandfather around his seemingly endless backyard garden as he harvests giant field tomatoes, prunes cucumbers and zucchinis, tastes a green grape for ripeness, and feels the tenderness of peaches, pears, and apples as we pass their respective trees. He asks me...

March 15, 2018

It’s hard to be a conscious consumer!  We all know that higher prices prohibit us from consuming sustainably.  But the barriers facing the conscious consumer go well beyond costs and need to be considered from the perspective of a highly resilient system of interconnected forces that collectively make consumer responsibility analogous to climbing the proverbial waterfall.

Aside from higher costs, here is a list of some of the barriers I’ve faced on a regular basis:

1)  Transf...

February 9, 2018

Recently, the Wall Street Journal published an article outlining the “case against corporate social responsibility”. This was well written and is indeed a provocative piece for students of business, practitioners, academic scholars, and even policy makers. While I think the author brings up some very important points with which I agree, there are some elements of his logic that I find disturbing, or at least misguided.

Where I Agree

First, the author states, “in cases where private...

February 5, 2018

Last Thursday afternoon, having forgotten my lunch at home, I spent an hour trying to find something to eat.  I walked and drove up and down a number of streets in a small corner of the GTA, passing by 4 Tim Hortons, 3 Pizza Pizzas, 8 Subways, a Wendy’s, a KFC, 2 McDonald’s, and a Pizza Hut.  One day later, driving north from Toronto on highway 400, I was overtaken again by hunger.  I passed a couple of large service stations that had a wide array of food options from Pizza Pizza to S...

January 20, 2018

 The flurry of news and commentary regarding Ontario’s wage increase has been dizzying not only because of the amount of commentary but because of how definitive people seem to be despite the stark contrast in arguments they are proposing.  Those on the left like the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star tend to push back the view that increasing wages compromises business and the economy while those on the right like the National Post and The Fraser Institute push back on the view that inc...

January 14, 2018

There is a growing trend associated with the relationship between business and civil society that has sparked some interesting discussion. 

Consider the following:

Growing Power is an NGO that works with youth to establish community food systems where local stakeholders grow and distribute food.  Several years ago, Growing Power was offered a donation of $500,000 from Monsanto as part of Monsanto’s ambition at the time to help youth in need.  The money would have been a boon f...

January 11, 2018

Why do people behave the way they do in any given society?  Better yet, why do organizations and the people within them behave the way they do? This is, no doubt, a complicated question, responded to by multiple theories that explore the complexity of human and organizational behaviour.  One such theory that has gained tremendous traction in the study of organizational behaviour is institutional theory.  Institutional theory draws from constructionism, which suggests that the outside...

January 2, 2018

I had the opportunity to read a very interesting case on Coca-Cola© and their efforts to assist in achieving the Millennium Development Goals, one of which is to eradicate poverty and hunger. The initiative they have in place has been touted by the World Bank and the United Nations as a leading 'Inclusive Business Model'. Here’s how it works. To get their produc

ts into the far reaches of rural Africa, they created Manual Distribution Centres whereby a local community person purchases...

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